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Sustaining journalism in a pandemic: ‘We need each other’

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Members of the Chicago Independent Media Alliance share a laugh during a recent Zoom event to promote the organization. CIMA recently raised more than $160,000 for its member news organizations with a fundraiser that had been planned for 2021 but was bumped way up the calendar because of the impacts the COVID-19 pandemic was having on their revenue.

 

Fast-tracked fundraiser generates $160K-plus for Chicago media outlets

By CHRISTOPHER HEIMERMAN
For Illinois Press Association

CHICAGO – The writing has long been on the wall for plucky, vital weekly newspapers: If new revenue streams aren’t created, the light that media outlets shine on their communities, many of them underserved, will be dimmed if not put out altogether.

Tracy Baim, a legendary journalist who co-founded her first publication in the city in 1985, is the publisher of the Chicago Reader, which has covered the city with a unique literary voice and a fine focus on the arts. Unearthing corruption is a hallmark of the Reader, as well.

“We’ve seen corruption increase, and scandals and politicians that have gone unchallenged,” Baim said. “Corruption loves when newspapers die.”

Seeing the plight of her publications – she also owns the Windy City Times – and her colleagues throughout the city, she hatched an idea last year to form an alliance that would unite outlets in the spirit of collaborating and, in turn, becoming more viable.

The kickstarting initiative for what would become the Chicago Independent Media Alliance, was a mass fundraiser that would happen in 2021.

Then the pandemic hit, and Baim buried the accelerator on a project that was rolling along at a comfortable pace. A website needed to be built, just one of several proverbial plates that needed to start spinning.

“I was really worried it wasn’t going to play out,” Baim said. “Lots of things could go wrong, so all I could think of was the worst-case scenarios. There was a lot of stress because of all the need that was there at a very scary time, and we had three weeks to get ready to launch.”

Not only did it play out; the public donated more than $100,000 – about $40,000 more than the goal. Additionally, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, The Joyce Foundation, the Joseph & Bessie Feinberg Foundation, the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation and two anonymous foundations matched funds to the tune of $60,000.

“It’s honestly way more than we could have expected,” said Yong Lee, marketing manager for the Korea Times which, like the Reader, has been in business since 1971.

He said the Times, which prints in Korean only and serves about 10,000 readers, received about $8,000 from the fundraiser.

Baim said the alliance plans to develop ways for the outlets to raise funds individually, but also as a collective. In the meantime, those looking to support local media may find a list of all 43 outlets at the campaign’s website, savechicagomedia.org.

 

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Yazmin Dominguez (Credit: GlitterGuts)

 

Fast-riser helms rapid-fire rollout

Baim said the only concerns with the launch were technological. Most notably, the website needed to be built and launched. She otherwise was confident because she had a rising star in Yazmin Dominguez, who’d joined the Reader less than a year ago as an administrative assistant and risen to the role of media partnerships coordinator in six short months. She became the project coordinator of CIMA.

She contacted about 160 local organizations, the list was narrowed to 103, and eventually the alliance had 62 members, 43 of which participated in the fundraiser.

“She masterfully herded cats,” said Charlie Meyerson, who has worked in Chicago media since 1979 and launched the independent news site Chicago Public Square in January 2017. “I’ve been very impressed with the way Yazmin kept the wheels on the tracks.”

“Impressive is not enough,” Lee said. “There has to be another word to describe the awesomeness of how she pulled this off.”

Dominguez said many publications lost 90 percent of their advertising revenue “overnight” – including the Reader, where that loss was more than $250,000.

Ron Roenigk is publisher of Inside Publications, which features three papers on the North Side: Skyline, Inside Booster and News-Star. Much of its revenue vanished along with its summer activity guide.

“Until this year, we had a North Side summer activity guide, and now since there’s no activity, there’s no guide,” he said during one of three Facebook Live videos Dominguez moderated in the last week of the fundraiser, a last-ditch push that she said drove up donations significantly.

Baim said two-thirds of the fundraiser’s donors asked that their contributions be split among the 43 outlets.

“I was pleasantly surprised,” she said. “That really shows that people wanted to support a strong journalism ecosystem.”

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Jesus Del Toro, director general of La Raza Newspaper, has worked in local media for 16 years, since moving to the U.S. from Mexico. He’s seen damning signs of the times. So while the funds raised can only help, he’s optimistic for what the alliance can mean for local media’s sustainability.

“The most important thing is that the fundraiser is the first step toward a much wider benefit, given the struggle of local media,” he said. “We needed a transformation of the local media model. We need to show advertisers the value of our product, and that they need to preserve it. The fundraiser helped, but of course what’s more valuable is what will happen in the long run, with collaboration and a unified front.”

 

A future built on trust

It’s a scary place these days. Revenue was dwindling before the pandemic, and the rise of armchair journalists has hamstrung the industry with fake news, Baim said.

In 2019, the Chicago Defender closed its legacy print paper and the weekly Latinx paper Hoy has been shut down by the Tribune.

“We knew before COVID that journalism wasn’t in the best shape in Chicago,” Dominguez said. “A lot of newsrooms are closing – a lot of papers we really admired. We knew we had to do something about it.”

Baim said she’s relieved that, thus far, no CIMA member has had to close its doors or cease production.

Meyerson said media outlets, large ones in particular, have long used the term right-sizing – “which means layoffs, basically,” he said – but like it or not, it’s reality. What’s yet to be seen is what that right size is for the media landscape at large.

“Is it going to be the big companies shrinking, or the small companies growing?” Meyerson said. “This is an opportunity for small, digital organizations to grow. That’s what I love about this campaign. This was a chance for those small organizations to grow. And for the bigger organizations, like the Reader, their audiences can be convinced to get involved monetarily in ways they weren’t before.”

“The fundraiser gives hope for news outlets like ours,” Lee said. “It was completely built on trust. And we don’t even know each other, but we have the same mission.”

“The communities that are most affected, their papers tell a unique story, in an authentic way than the mainstream has never been able to do,” Baim said. “I’m an evangelist for local media of any kind. It could be the only paper in a rural area, or a paper that serves the black, Asain or LGBTQ community. The papers are part of their ecosystem.”

Baim said evidence of fast-built trust is encouraging, given that the alliance was spearheaded by the Reader specifically.

“It’s kind of an odd duck when an alliance is created by one of its members, to have one paper raising money for another paper,” she said. “But we all needed to survive. We need each other.”

 

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The power of good

Baim said feel-good stories do more than make readers … well … feel good. She said showcasing the hard work businesses, nonprofit organizations and individuals are putting in to better their communities creates a contagious buzz of good will. And having local media eager to preach the gospel of good not only engenders trust, it strengthens all parties involved.

“We don’t just tell the stories when they’re bad. We tell the stories when they’re good,” Baim said. “When you tell a story about a business, a nonprofit, there are many residual benefits to that. You develop partnerships and allies.”

Dominguez is proud, but not satisfied with the alliance’s immediate success.

“This has been attempted many times in the past, alliances of this sort in Chicago media,” she said. “Now we have a lot of public attention. CIMA is such a baby project right now, and the fundraiser put us in the public eye. Two months ago, only the Chicago Reader and member outlets knew about the alliance.”

A key goal going forward is to create a pooled journalism fund featuring multiple funding streams, including public and private foundations, private donors, and government.

More than half of the alliance’s members are unable to offer insurance to their full-time employees, so a pooled insurance fund for Chicago-area journalists – full-timers and freelancers alike – is in the works.

“We have way bigger goals for 2021,” Dominguez said. “This is just the beginning.”

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Press Releases

 

 

Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau
hires new tourism manager


FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION
Aug. 16, 2021
Media Contact: Scott Dahl
217-789-2360, ext. 5531
scott.dahl@springfield.il.us

 

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau announces the hiring of a new Tourism Manager to lead the Springfield Visitors Center and tourism efforts for the City of Springfield.  

Sarah Waggoner will assume the position, held by Jeff Berg who has been with the SCVB for nearly two decades, beginning on Monday, Aug. 23, 2021. Sarah brings an extensive résumé of tourism experience, most recently as tourism coordinator for the City of Litchfield. Most notably, she developed and oversaw the Litchfield Pickers Market, including coordination of the market, social media and marketing efforts. Additionally, her responsibilities included budget management, website functions and developing overall marketing strategies for the City of Litchfield tourism effort.
 
As tourism manager for Visit Springfield, Sarah will be tasked with managing the Visitors Center, serving as liaison to state and federal historical sites and institutions as well as all programming and scheduling for the History Comes Alive summer program, in its 13th year in 2022.  

About Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau
The Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau (SCVB) is the official destination marketing organization for the City of Springfield, Illinois. As a department of the City of Springfield, the SCVB markets the capital city as a unique convention, meeting and leisure destination in support of our City, our community and our hospitality partners.scott.dahl@springfield.il.us

# # #

For more information, or to schedule an interview with Scott Dahl, please call 217-789-2360, ext. 5531; 217-341-9802 or e-mail scott.dahl@springfield.il.us
 


 

 
 

Warbirds over Greenville, Illinois


FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION
Aug. 16, 2021
Craig Baumberger, member, Greenville Pilots Association
618-664-0926
craigbaumberger@yahoo.com


Airstravaganza 2021 will be held at the Greenville Illinois Airport on Oct. 9-10. The main attraction will be a visit by the Mitchell B-25 bomber and the Grumman TBM (torpedo bomber) of the Missouri wing of the Commemorative Air Force based at St Charles, Missouri. These aircraft will be on static display on Saturday, Oct. 9, and will be available for rides on Sunday, Oct. 10. This is a rare opportunity for the general public to purchase a trip aboard the B-25, the bomber that flew from the USS Hornet in 1942 to deliver the first retaliatory blow against the Japanese in World War II. Rides will also be available in the TBM, the largest single-engine military aircraft in World War II and the same type flown by President George H.W. Bush in the Pacific. This is a great opportunity to get a look up close at an important part of our military history.

Rides in the B-25 will cost $395. Five people at a time will ride, with the opportunity to move around the aircraft while in flight and check out the cockpit, bombardiers station, and the cramped quarters in the fuselage. TBM rides will cost $895. There will be a limited number of rides available, so they should be booked in advance. In addition to the warbirds, Waco biplane rides will be available if booked in advance. Cessna and helicopter rides will be available on Saturday, Oct. 9

For info and to reserve a flight, contact Kevin Blaney at 618-520-5362 or kfblaney@gmail.com. Mention "warbirds."

The event is supported by the Greenville Airport Authority and conducted by the Greenville Pilots Association/EAA Chapter 1382. For info or to volunteer, call Craig Baumberger at 618-322-3532 or the Greenville Airport at 618-664-0926. Also, check it out on Facebook or contact gaa@gmail.com. Greenville Airport is located approximately 5 miles south of Greenville on Illinois Route 127 at 1574 Sky Lane, Greenville.

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Dr. Marcus Belin named first black president
of the Illinois Principals Association


FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION
June 30, 2021
Alison Maley, government and public relations director
217-299-3122
alison@ilprincipals.org

 

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Principals Association is proud to announce Dr. Marcus Belin, principal of Huntley High School in Huntley as association president for the 2021-2022 school term. Dr. Belin also becomes the first Black president of the Illinois Principals Association.

During Dr. Belin’s term of office, the Illinois Principals Association will celebrate its 50th anniversary, culminating with the organization’s annual conference Oct. 24-26 in Peoria.

“For the past 50 years, the Illinois Principals Association has developed a legacy in the state to support school leaders,” Dr. Belin said. “As we enter a year to celebrate a Legacy of Leaders, I am excited to see the continued focus on furthering the organization's focus on diversity, advocacy, and leadership at the local and national levels. This organization has developed a system of support to develop school leaders and will continue to be an integral part of strengthening the pipeline for school leadership. I am humbled to serve as the president of this organization.”

Dr. Jason Leahy, executive director for the Illinois Principals Association, adds, “Dr. Marcus Belin is an exceptional, student focused school leader. He possesses a contagious passion for creating an organizational environment, both in his school and the IPA, where everyone is provided the support and encouragement they need to thrive. As the IPA celebrates its 50th anniversary and our schools come out of the pandemic, the Association is fortunate to have Dr. Belin at the helm.”

Dr. Belin has most recently been recognized as one of three Digital Principals of the Year by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). At Huntley High School, Belin has overseen three years of Huntley’s blended competency-based learning program for in-person and online learning to enable students to master competencies in core subject areas. The school has also used technology to engage students in social-emotional learning lessons in topics such as anxiety and mental health.

Dr. Belin has been a member of the Illinois Principals Association since 2013. During this time, he has served as state legislative chairperson, Kishwaukee Region Membership chair, and Central Illinois Valley Region Membership chair. He began his career in education in 2010 as a fifth- and sixth-grade social studies teacher at Quest Charter Academy Middle School in Peoria and continued at Quest Charter Academy High School as dean of students/assistant principal through 2015. Dr. Belin later served as assistant principal of Dunlap High School in Dunlap and became principal of Huntley High School in 2018.

Dr. Marcus Belin resides in Huntley with his wife, Monique Belin, an elementary instructional coach in Huntley District #158, and their three children, Maliyah, Makenzie, and Mekhi. Dr. Belin received his Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education and master’s degree in Education Administration from Bradley University, and his Doctoral degree from National Lewis University.

The Illinois Principals Association is a leadership organization which serves more than 6,000 educational leaders throughout the state of Illinois and whose mission is to develop, support, and advocate for innovative educational leaders. For more information about the IPA, please visit www.ilprincipals.org.
 

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Illinois Principals Association names new executive board and board members


FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION
June 30, 2021
Alison Maley, government and public relations director
217-299-3122
alison@ilprincipals.org

 

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Principals Association, which serves more than 6,000 educational leaders throughout Illinois, announces the following school leaders to serve as the executive board for the IPA, effective July 1, 2021.

President – Dr. Marcus Belin, Huntley High School, Huntley

Immediate Past-President – Dr. Amy Dixon, Jefferson & Lincoln Attendance Centers, Carmi

President-Elect – Raúl Gastón, Jefferson Middle School, Villa Park

Treasurer – Craig Beals, Nuttall Middle School, Robinson

Secretary – Mandy Ellis, Dunlap Grade School, Dunlap

Other new board members include:

Marty Adams, principal of Hawthorn Elementary School, Salem, as state director for the Kaskaskia Region.

Dr. Bridget Belcastro, principal at Johnsburg Elementary School, Johnsburg, continues her service on the Board of Directors as Illinois representative for the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). Dr. Belcastro previously served as state director for the Kishwaukee Region.

Lori Bilbrey, Alternative/Safe Schools and Truancy Program administrator for Regional Office of Education #26, Macomb, as state director for the Western Region.

Michelle Chavers, principal at Limestone Middle School, Kankakee, as state director for the Three Rivers Region. Chavers previously served as region director for the Three Rivers Region.

Courtney DeMent, principal of Downers Grove North High School, Downers Grove, as state director for the DuPage Region. DeMent previously served as region director for the DuPage Region.

Terica Doyle, assistant principal at Carbondale Community High School, Carbondale, joins the Board of Directors as membership chair. Doyle was previously recognized as IPA Shawnee Region Assistant Principal of the Year in 2017.

Sean German, principal at Argenta-Oreana High School, Oreana, continues his service as Illinois coordinator for the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). German previously served as president of the association (2015-2016) and state director for the Abe Lincoln Region.

Heidi Lensing, principal at Eagle Ridge School, Silvis, continues her service on the Board of Directors as legislative chair. Lensing previously served as state director for the Blackhawk Region.

Chris Rice, principal of Meade Park Elementary School, Danville, as state director for the Illini Region.

Arturo Senteno, associate principal of instruction at Elk Grove High School, Elk Grove Village, as representative to the State Educator Preparation and Licensure Board (SEPLB).

The Illinois Principals Association is a leadership organization which serves more than 6,000 educational leaders throughout the state of Illinois and whose mission is to develop, support, and advocate for innovative educational leaders. For more information about the IPA, please visit www.ilprincipals.org.

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Principals from across the nation to gather in Chicago for NAESP's 100th anniversary celebration and Pre-K-8 principals conference

After a year of uncertainty, principals will come together in person
to prepare for post-pandemic leadership
 


MEDIA ADVISORY
June 28, 2021
Kaylen Tucker, NAESP
703-518-6257
ktucker@naesp.org

 

ALEXANDRIA, Virginia — Elementary and middle-level principals from across the nation will gather July 8-10 in Chicago for the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) Pre-K–8 Principals Conference. The conference is a significant one in the history of public education — marking 100 years of service for the association and a return to relative normalcy after a year of school closures due to COVID-19. Learn more at www.naespconference.org.

#NAESP21 is the largest national conference for elementary and middle-level principals. With a laser focus on Pre-K through grade 8 school leaders, the conference will address topics aligned to the Professional Standards for Education Leaders, such as equity, engagement, and building professional capacity.

Preconference activities begin July 7 with sessions geared toward assistant principals, early career principals, and veteran principals. Visit the conference website for a full list of sessions. Highlights of this year’s conference will include:

Insight from Education Experts. Some of the brightest minds in education will share fresh thinking and innovative strategies to return to in-person learning this fall. Keynote speakers are Baruti Kafele, a highly regarded urban educator who has distinguished himself as a master teacher and a transformational school leader; Ruby Payne, an educator and author best known for her work on the culture of poverty and its relation to education; and Dan Heath, who is an innovative business thought leader and The New York Times best-selling author.

A Century of NAESP. In 2021, NAESP celebrates 100 years as a member association — and launches into its next century as the largest community for elementary and middle-level principals. On this landmark occasion, we embrace our rich history and generate momentum toward our exciting future. Learn more about NAESP history.

Honoring the Nation’s Best Principals and Assistant Principals. NAESP is pleased to honor the 2020 class of NAESP National Distinguished Principals as well as the 2020 and 2021 classes of National Outstanding Assistant Principals.

The Centers for Advancing Leadership. Learn about the Centers for Diversity Leadership, Innovative Leadership, Women in Leadership, and Middle-Level Leadership through highly energetic sessions led by the center fellows. These sessions will enable conference attendees to expand their principal networks and share innovative ideas they have used to move their leadership and their schools well beyond the status quo.

The conference experience will also feature an Exhibit Hall, which includes industry-leading vendors with innovative services and products for schools.

Conference attendees will share their experiences on social media using the hashtag #NAESP21.

For more information on NAESP’s annual conference, visit www.naespconference.org. Contact Kaylen Tucker (ktucker@naesp.org) for press credentials or interviews.

# # #

Contact:
Principals are the primary catalysts for creating lasting foundations for learning. Since 1921, the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) has been the leading advocate for elementary and middle-level principals in the U.S.and worldwide. NAESP advances the profession by developing policy, advancing advocacy, and providing professional learning and resources for instructional leadership, including specialized support and mentoring for early career principals. Key focus areas include pre-K–3 education, school safety, technology and digital learning, and effective educator evaluation. For more information about NAESP, please visit www.naesp.org.


 

 

 
 

 

 

C. Lynn Mason, President and CEO, Broadstep Behavioral Health

 
 

Broadstep acquires Bethesda residential and support programs in Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin
 


June 23, 2021
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 

RALEIGH, North Carolina – Broadstep Behavioral Health, serving individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and severe persistent mental illness (SPMI), acquired Bethesda Lutheran Communities’ residential and support programs in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Broadstep is a portfolio company of Bain Capital’s Double Impact fund.
 
“We are pleased to welcome Bethesda team members and the individuals they serve into the Broadstep family,” said Lynn Mason, Broadstep’s president and CEO. “Together, we look forward to addressing the many challenges facing behavioral health care and continuing to improve the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities – a mission established by Bethesda almost 120 years ago.”
 
Bethesda Lutheran Communities (BLC) provides services and support for those diagnosed with I/DD through community-based homes, day programs, at-home life skills development, job placement, and behavioral support. By acquiring BLC homes in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin, Broadstep continues its expansion of residential services in the Midwest, following on the heels of the acquisition of Good Hope Manor in Wisconsin in December.
 
The Case for Inclusion, released annually by the Ancor Foundation and United Cerebral Palsy, reveals a waiting list for housing and services of more than 26,000 people in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin ­– and more than 470,000 people nationwide. Rising costs, low medical reimbursements, reduced revenue from other sources, and the COVID-19 pandemic have adversely impacted programs for individuals with I/DD.
 
According to a report by the KUNI Foundation published by Spectrum Life Magazine, “People with intellectual and developmental disabilities face a housing crisis.” Supply is not meeting demand in the United States.
 
“There are so many individuals that need help,” said Mason, named president and CEO of Broadstep in 2019. “Behavioral health is still a segment of the population that is largely forgotten. That’s not where they should be. Individuals with low IQs are not only challenged with their learning disability, many also struggle with behavioral health disorders that have never been addressed. At Broadstep, I believe we can build the right continuum of care and align with great community partners, health systems, and payers to help address these needs.”
 
According to Dr. Scott Huntington, Ph.D., Broadstep’s chief clinical officer and former corrections system psychologist, undiagnosed and untreated behavioral health disabilities weigh heavily on the judicial system, with many individuals in prison. “Putting their quality of life in jail aside for a moment, the cost to keep and treat individuals in prison is three times the amount of those not incarcerated. This person, this child, this adult, is struggling, and we believe we have the opportunity within this health care system and with our partners to tackle these challenges. We want to make sure they can live a good quality, productive life and be an additive back to their communities.”
 
When access to care is provided to this population, the positive impact is undeniable. According to a recent study by the American Journal on Public Health, Americans living with disabilities with no home support system receive less preventive care, have a higher incidence of chronic conditions, and visit the hospital and emergency department more often — leading to much higher health care spending than for the average adult.
 
About Broadstep Behavioral Health
Founded in Wisconsin in 1972, Broadstep Behavioral Health provides a continuum of physical, emotional, and mental support for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illness, and co-occurring disorders. Broadstep offers a range of support programs, including residential group homes, specialized schools for children, and vocational and day programs that help foster life skills development and realize social and professional potential. Broadstep Behavioral Health operates in seven states (Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey, Nebraska, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Wisconsin).  Visit www.broadstep.com to learn more.
 
About Bain Capital Double Impact (BCDI)
Bain Capital Double Impact is the impact investing strategy of Bain Capital, a leading global private investment firm. Applying Bain Capital’s value-added approach to impact investing, BCDI partners with companies to scale their growth and impact to solve critical social problems alongside a financial return. BCDI’s areas of focus are health and wellness, sustainability, and education and workforce development. BCDI was named 2020’s Global Impact Investment Fund of the Year by London-based Private Equity International.
Visit www.BainCapitalDoubleImpact.com to learn more.

# # #

Contact:
John Tote, VP of Business Development
Broadstep Behavioral Health
jtote@broadstep.com
919-219-3944
 
Permission granted for redistribution
 
#Broadstep #Bethesda #BainCapital #NorthCarolina #Wisconsin #Illinois #Indiana #SouthCarolina #NewJersey #Nebraska #Boston #IntellectualDevelopmentalDisabilities #IDD #Autism #MentalIllness #LynnMason #DoubleImpactFund #JohnTote #ImpactFund
 
Robert Butler – Communications & Public Relations ­– www.RBButler.com

 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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